Monday, 28 July 2014

Garden Visiting In July - Part One

Temple Newsam is a place we visit often. I grew up within walking distance and we now live just a ten minute car journey away. I've wrote about it many times on my Through The Keyhole blog, a couple of the posts are Temple Newsam and Temple Newsam Rhododendron Walk.

On this occasion, our trip to Temple Newsam was to visit the walled garden for my garden visit for July.


The walled gardens were set up on this site in 1788 and were used for the cultivation of vegetables, fruit and cut flowers for the house. The gardens became famous for the cultivation of pineapples, the gardeners produced Queen pineapples weighing five or six pounds each. By the mid nineteenth century other varieties such as White Providence, Montserrat and Prince Albert were also being propagated.

The walled garden now presents an extensive rose garden originating from about 1923.


Around the walls are magnificent herbaceous borders, some of which are 800 yards in length.




The borders are quite deep and have some glorious height to them.





Such bold splashes of colour.





As you enter the walled garden, you can see the 'lean-to' conservatory which contains a host of temperate plants.


There's a fabulous potting area in the doorway of the conservatory with different bays set aside for the different composts used. How I'd love an area like this to do my own potting.


The first area you come to inside the conservatory is filled with zonal pelargoniums, such a fabulous display. They're trained to cover the full height of the wall, some 10 - 12 feet.


There are also upright fuchsias here, I've never seen fuchsias with such thick stems, but they're grown so that they flower above head height and are a brilliant feature.


The next area you come across is filled with coleus, so many different varieties.


I love the contrasts between the zinging lime green varieties and the darker leafed specimens.



Next, we come to an area which houses plants from Central and South America. These are abutilons, a plant I'm not familiar with but part of the mallow family. I love the effect against the whitewashed walls.



This ipomoea is such a gorgeous colour, it really zings.


Bougainvillea Barbara Karst.


As we exit the conservatory, we're back again in the rose garden. It looks fabulous from this elevated position with the park land behind the walls.


The gardens are also home to five of the eleven national collections held by Leeds City Council, including delphinium, phlox, aster, chrysanthemum and solenostemon.

We're so lucky to have such a beautiful place on our doorstep. Pop back for Part Two and I'll show you some more.

30 comments:

  1. A beautiful garden Jo, I love the herbaceous borders, they are stunning aren't they. It must take an awful lot of work to keep them looking like that. The pink achillea is so pretty amassed like that isn't it. I look forward to part 2. xx

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    1. The borders are fabulous, absolutely jam packed with plants. I do like to see whole groupings of the same plant together, it really makes a statement.

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  2. A most enjoyable post and lots of wonderful pictures. There is something about walled gardens that appeals to many gardeners, myself included.
    That coleus display is amazing. I'm looking forward to part two! Flighty xx

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    1. I love walled gardens too, I remember reading The Secret Garden when I was a child and wishing I had a walled garden of my own even then. There were so many varieties of coleus, a stunning display.

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  3. Before I was married I lived in Woodlesford and as a teenager I would walk with friends to Temple Newsam. It's a lovely spot with lots of varied areas, We used ti access along Bullerthorpe lane through a wooded walk which I think used to be the main drive

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    1. I used to live very near to the opposite end of Bullerthorpe Lane to you when I was growing up. Sometimes we'd walk through Colton, whilst it was all still farmland before any of the shops which are there now were built, and sometimes we'd take the same walk as you through the woods. We still sometimes park on Bullerthorpe Lane and walk that way, Archie loves it as there's so many scents for him to sniff out.

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    2. Did you live in Whitkirk? I had a friend who lived there that I picked up every morning as I drove along the ring road when we were both students in Headingley.

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    3. No, I lived in Austhorpe, just about opposite the entrance to Bullerthorpe Lane. Our street was the last one and looked out on to all the farm land. The houses now look out on to Thorpe Park and the new link road which is such a shame. My mum and dad saw many changes in the forty years they lived there.

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  4. Wow those borders are beautiful how I would love the space to have one of those :). What a gorgeous garden to spend some time in I can see why you love to visit and how wonderful that it is on your doorstep.

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    1. I love looking at all the plant combinations in the borders, they've designed them so well. Temple Newsam is a fabulous place, the walled garden is only a tiny part, there's so much here, something for everyone.

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  5. Those borders are stunning, as are the Coleus xxx

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    1. I was really impressed with the borders, they're so deep yet jam packed with plants. They look fabulous.

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  6. I love a walk around the walled garden when we visit and always think it's a pity they're not replanted as a walled kitchen garden. The potential of that greenhouse is enormous.

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    1. I must admit that I do like to see a walled garden planted up as a kitchen garden. You'd think it would make sense to them with having the cafe. I know they source the produce locally and use their own rare breed sausages and burgers so it would be fitting to be growing their own vegetables and fruit too.

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  7. What a beautiful looking place, and those herbaceous borders...just wow!

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    1. The borders do have the wow factor. They've obviously put a lot of time and work in to them.

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  8. I'm just doing a catchup on your garden blog and have just been blown away by the Temple Newsam photos. Gorgeous. I remember growing coleus inside many years ago as houseplants. Can't wait to see your next instalment. Take care.

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    1. We're so lucky to have such a lovely place close by. I've grown coleus from seed in the past but the display here is something else, absolutely fantastic.

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  9. The sheer scale of all that lot is awe-inspiring! I wonder how many Coleus they have, for instance...

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    1. It would be interesting to hear more about what goes in to keeping up with gardens such as this, especially when they're putting on such a fabulous show with lots of varieties of one plant. We're really lucky to have this on our doorstep.

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  10. The potting area is to die for, all that space! it looks so organised as well. Maybe I should go and visit to get some tips x

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    1. I'd love a dedicated potting area. Just one of those bays would be very welcome here.

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  11. What wonderful displays in all of the areas! I've never seen pelargoniums growing up a wall like that, for example. A lot of hard work must go into keeping everything looking so beautiful. As you say, it would be good to see fruit and vegetables being cultivated there too. It's a very attractive garden with the countryside as a continuation backdrop of greenery.

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    1. The pelargoniums are stunning, I've never see a display such as this anywhere else either. The garden is within park land and woodland further beyond so it's a beautiful setting.

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  12. Oh wow! What a visual feast for the eyes, how lovely to have such a paradise so close by. I did enjoy this.xxx

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    1. We're so lucky with so many beautiful places to visit nearby. Temple Newsam is a favourite as there's so many different areas, something different to see each time we visit.

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  13. What a great place to visit Jo. Even a little bit of that potting shed would do me and oh what fabulous borders. I wonder how many gardeners are employed to keep it looking that good. Do you think that coleus were eventually heading out for the big world outside? Such attractive and contrasting colours.

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    1. The individual potting stations are fabulous. There's information on the walls about different composts too, all very interesting. I think the coleus are destined to spend their life in the conservatory, it looked that way anyway, but I may be wrong.

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  14. What a lovely garden, the herbaceous borders and the coleus in the greenhouse are lovely (as is the whole garden). Looks to be a great day out.

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    1. I love the borders, there's so many plants packed in that you don't really appreciate everything that's there. Definitely worth going time and time again for, you end up noticing something different every time.

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